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Pine trees are well-used as feature plantings in many parts of Colwyn Bay, but those with the greatest impact are those elegantly lining the road into Rhos-on-Sea set on the steep sea-facing railway embankment.

Pine trees along Colwyn Bay embankment

Pine trees along Colwyn Bay embankment

Where the trees thin out primroses smother the grassy embankment. They began flowering early this year but look as though they will continue for some time to come.

Pine tree and primroses

Pine tree and primroses

A lovely clump of fragrant primroses

A lovely clump of fragrant primroses

The back of Colwyn Bay railway station

The back of Colwyn Bay railway station

The grassy embankment is a favourite spot for Herring gulls to paddle for worms.

Herring gulls paddling for worms

Herring gulls paddling for worms

I walked along the promenade then crossed the road at the point where it is possible to access the elevated pathway near the top of the embankment.

View to Rhos-on-Sea

View to Rhos-on-Sea

Daisy growing from embankment wall

Daisy growing from embankment wall

Fallen pine cones on embankment wall

Fallen pine cones on embankment wall

The pathway high up on the embankment leads through the pines and offers some protection on cold windy days such as this one was as well as an elevated view. I’ve always been curious about where this gated tunnel leads, but assume it comes out somewhere close to the railway station.

Iron gate closing off a tunnel under the railway line

Iron gate closing off a tunnel under the railway line

Pathway along the embankment

Pathway along the embankment

Ivy clambering high into a pine tree

Ivy clambering high into a pine tree

This can be a good place to see a number of bird species amongst the trees, but today there was just a solitary crow.

Crow enjoying the view out to sea

Crow enjoying the view out to sea

There are other species of tree along the path and I came across the stump of a felled ash tree that is regenerating from its base. It also had a mature patch of the curious brittle black King Alfred’s Cakes Daldinia concentrica  fungus.

Cut ash tree regenerating with King Alfred's Cakes fungus

Cut ash tree regenerating with King Alfred’s Cakes fungus

Scots Pine branch with cones

Scots Pine branch with cones

Approaching the end of the path

Approaching the end of the path

The elevated pathway offers a good view of the Porth Eirias Watersports centre

The elevated pathway offers a good view of the Porth Eirias Watersports centre

The pathway ends by the railway bridge opposite Porth Eirias where these beautiful Hellebores were growing.

Hellebores (Lenten Roses) with green flowers

Hellebores (Lenten Roses) with green flowers

It’s good to see that the traditional planting of pines is being continued. There are several young trees in beds at the front of Porth Eirias.

A newly-planted pine tree at Porth Eirias

A newly-planted pine tree at Porth Eirias

A last look at the sea splashing up onto the rocks at the base of the sea wall before gratefully retreating into the shelter of my car.

160214-Sea splashing on rocks